Monday, February 10, 2020

The Rights of Children With Respect to Education and Health Essay

The Rights of Children With Respect to Education and Health - Essay Example This issue has the potential for controversy, as a reference to "religion" has the potential to encompass a wide range of subject matters in the social and physical sciences. Potential disagreements are predicted in terms of natural history, such as lessons concerning dinosaurs and evolutionary theory. Even matters purely in the purview of recorded human history could provoke contention, such as descriptions of the Crusades, or the Holocaust, or possibly any form of comparative religious study. (Dickerson, 2009 A) Sources in the government describe the purpose of these amendments as a clarification of the Alberta human rights and citizenship commission responsibilities. This is seen as a necessity in order to streamline the process by which rights appeals are efficiently addressed as they arise. This is accomplished through the separation human rights commission's current role as an investigative body, as well as the deliberative organization that mediates and the judges complaints. Separating these two functions should improve the efficiency of your product functions relating to the resolution of human rights allegations. A funding increase also assisted the commission in the execution of these duties.ntial to address additional complexities in complaint resolution likely to stem from these measures. The government's ability to address   issues of free speech has not been abridged. The commission retains unlimited power to issue judgments on matters pertaining expression. This has important implications regarding the potential for censorship of written material. This is contrary to predictions by government insiders, but considerable deliberation occurred in regards to the consequences of any removal of the term "publications". (Government of Alberta, 2009 C), (Dickerson, 2009 A) free speech advocates were disappointed by the measure, who had submitted policy recommendations in favor of the removal of measures which they felt represented limitations upon fre e expression in Alberta. (Fekete, 2009) Supporters anticipate few arguments as a result of these measures. While parents theoretically have the freedom to remove their children from these classes that might cover sensitive subjects, the number of parents that execute that power are limited. However, additional scrutiny is warranted according to opposition parties within the government, who are likely to subject parental opt-out clauses to closer examination within legislative deliberations. (Audette, 2009.), (Dickerson, 2009 A) The available information describing the concerns of government officials and free speech advocates shape their concern without regard to the child's opinion. Understandable, and arguably normal - as it is the parents

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Breakfast Club Analysis Essay Example for Free

Breakfast Club Analysis Essay The well-known song â€Å"Don’t You Forget about Me† plays at the end of the movie The Breakfast Club, signaling not only the end of the famous movie, but also the end of the transitory group that had developed in the earlier scenes. Although movie was released over twenty years ago, high school students today can still use the labels that are examined in the movie to identify themselves in the cruel world they call high school. With the final lines â€Å"you see us as you want to see usIn the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions,† the point of the movie finally becomes apparent; stereotypes are not accurate representations of teenagers, but instead they accurately represent who teenagers think they are. There is no doubt that students all come with labels; it is inevitable. But whether a student is a brain, a jock or a princess, they are all greatly impacted by the stereotypes and boundaries that are a part of each of their social groups. To teenagers, being a part of a social group is huge, as portrayed in The Breakfast Club. As soon as the movie starts, viewers can decipher the cliques that each student is in. When the students are being dropped off, viewers assume which cliques each student is in by their appearances, how they respond to their parents, and how they react to coming to school on a Saturday. The most important identification of each student’s clique is seen by where they sit in the library. Much like the school cafeteria today, the students sat where they felt comfortable. In this case, it was away from everyone else in the room, with the exception of Andrew and Claire who were already in similar social groups and had similar friends. Bender eventually approaches the topic of the students’ separate cliques by asking Andrew, â€Å"Do you think Id speak for you? I dont even know your language.† The students, while all in similar situations have trouble effectively communicating because they do not really know each other. This proves how drastically different teenagers are from those not included in their immediate friend group. Humans in general, especially teenagers, are greatly influenced by their peers and the activities that their peers participate in. This means that they are also largely impacted by the stereotypes that are associated with their cliques and social groups. Stereotypes change who teenagers think they are based upon what others are saying about them. Being forced into a role can completely change who a person is or how someone acts. For example, Andrew felt genuinely bad about taping together Larry Lester’s butt cheeks,  but he was influenced by his friends and by the expectations that he thought his father had for him. These expectations can drastically impact how teenagers treat one another. At the end of the movie, the boundaries outlined earlier in the film are semi-broken. Although, Claire tells Bender that she hates her friends, she remains friends with them because she does not feel like she would belong in another clique. The boundaries that are formed from the very beginning, such as the language each teenager uses or the lunches that they have, are finally broken when Allison takes the varsity letter off of Andrew’s jacket and when Claire gives Bender her earring. Although neither of these actions is huge, and none of the students will leave their prior friend group, they are beginning to break the boundaries that separated them in the first place. And though the breakfast club may never speak to each other again, they have developed a greater sense of understanding for each other and the cliques that they are all in. While Brian, Allison, Bender, Claire, and Andy may never talk to each other again, they may reconsider how they treat someone in a different social group than them or how they perceive someone who is different than them. The cliques are still going to exist, yet the students will be able to see others for who they really are, not for who others think they should be. Whether a student is impacted directly by their friends and peers, or by the boundaries that tie them to a specific group, the fact that there mindset is shifted by these pressures is unavoidable.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Advancement of Technology and Science and its Influence on Science Fiction Novels :: Technology Science Literature Essays

Advancement of Technology and Science and its Influence on Science Fiction Novels The rapid pace of technology and the advancement of scientific understanding in the past one hundred years are at the backbone for the distinctly twentieth century genre -- science fiction. Such rapid advancement in these fields of technology have opened up literally worlds of possibilities for the future. One hundred years ago the possibility of simply flying from city to city may have seemed nothing more than a distant futuristic dream to most. While a mere sixty years later the impossible was achieved -- a human being on the moon. Since technology has brought as much change as it has in the past one hundred years the next hundred should be entirely incomprehendable to us. Who knows what to expect? "The modern discoveries and applications of Science throw deeply into the shade the old romances and fanciful legends of our boyhood" (James 8) observes James. Technology has made what was once thought impossible, plausible and weather or not technology is directly incorporated into a science fi ction story as an obvious vehicle, the author knows that it is always present in the mind of the reader. It is this plausablilty of what conventionally should not be acceptable that has led to science fiction's increasing popularity over the years. As James explains, "much sf is concerned with the future and with the possibilities presented by scientific and technological change" (James 3). Truly, humans exploring and even colonizing other worlds, the plot of many a science fiction novel, has to many become inevitable. The successful series of Apollo moon landings in the 1960's and the knowledge that we already possess the technology to send humans to other worlds leads many to believe that it is only a matter of time. Even such a notably respectable news source as Newsweek has detailed the future maned missions to Mars (September, 23 1996). When I look forward to the future I can hardly imagine the changes that will occur as a result of new discoveries in science and new technologies. With so m any possibilities for the future, science fiction is able to capitalizes on this by showing the audience entirely new worlds and alternatives to our own. Technology presented in science fiction stories most commonly serves a very important role in the stories plausablilty to the audience. While this does not mean that technology is necessarily the focus of such stories it is often used as the vehicle for which such alternative and wonderous events occur. Without the advanced spaceship how could the Segnauts have gotten to the planet Advancement of Technology and Science and its Influence on Science Fiction Novels :: Technology Science Literature Essays Advancement of Technology and Science and its Influence on Science Fiction Novels The rapid pace of technology and the advancement of scientific understanding in the past one hundred years are at the backbone for the distinctly twentieth century genre -- science fiction. Such rapid advancement in these fields of technology have opened up literally worlds of possibilities for the future. One hundred years ago the possibility of simply flying from city to city may have seemed nothing more than a distant futuristic dream to most. While a mere sixty years later the impossible was achieved -- a human being on the moon. Since technology has brought as much change as it has in the past one hundred years the next hundred should be entirely incomprehendable to us. Who knows what to expect? "The modern discoveries and applications of Science throw deeply into the shade the old romances and fanciful legends of our boyhood" (James 8) observes James. Technology has made what was once thought impossible, plausible and weather or not technology is directly incorporated into a science fi ction story as an obvious vehicle, the author knows that it is always present in the mind of the reader. It is this plausablilty of what conventionally should not be acceptable that has led to science fiction's increasing popularity over the years. As James explains, "much sf is concerned with the future and with the possibilities presented by scientific and technological change" (James 3). Truly, humans exploring and even colonizing other worlds, the plot of many a science fiction novel, has to many become inevitable. The successful series of Apollo moon landings in the 1960's and the knowledge that we already possess the technology to send humans to other worlds leads many to believe that it is only a matter of time. Even such a notably respectable news source as Newsweek has detailed the future maned missions to Mars (September, 23 1996). When I look forward to the future I can hardly imagine the changes that will occur as a result of new discoveries in science and new technologies. With so m any possibilities for the future, science fiction is able to capitalizes on this by showing the audience entirely new worlds and alternatives to our own. Technology presented in science fiction stories most commonly serves a very important role in the stories plausablilty to the audience. While this does not mean that technology is necessarily the focus of such stories it is often used as the vehicle for which such alternative and wonderous events occur. Without the advanced spaceship how could the Segnauts have gotten to the planet

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

A critique of a defense of abortion a book by judith jarvis thomson Essay

In this paper, I will explain in what circumstances an abortion would be unjust based on Thomson’s argument.   Also, I will explain why this result does nothing to weaken her argument.   In Thomson’s â€Å"A Defense of Abortion†, she makes a claim that it is usually morally permissible, just that is, to have an abortion.   She defends this claim with varying analogies, the strongest being the case of the violinist which I will explain later.   Thomson’s main point (only for the sake of argument) is that the fetus does have a right to life (Thomson p. 29).   However, she also points out that it is morally permissible to perform an abortion if the fetus has not been granted the right to use the mother’s body (Thomson p.31).   I will argue that in certain cases the fetus is in fact granted right to use of the mother’s body, and therefore, in such cases, it would be unjust to perform an abortion. I will argue for this by presenting an analogy presented by Thomson in her paper.   In this analogy, Thomson presents a situation: You have been kidnapped by a music group to have your kidneys hooked up to a famous ailing violinist’s body for nine months in order for him to survive.   Thomson claims that it would not be unjust or morally impermissible for you to unplug yourself from the violinist’s body because he has been granted no right to use your body (Thomson p. 30).   Now, I will use this analogy to argue for when it would be unjust to unplug yourself from the violinist’s body.   Suppose, for example, that this music group had asked you for permission to use your body prior to plugging you into the violinist.   Say, that you gave them permission and agreed to be attached to the violinist for nine months.   However, later on, you decide that you have better things to do than to be stuck to this violinist for nine months, and then decide to unplu g yourself from the violinist, leading to his death.   That act would be an unjust killing; because you gave the violinist the right to use your body, then took it away from him. I will now use the example of an actual pregnancy to defend my argument for the unjust killing of a fetus.   Suppose that a young couple, both in their mid-twenties decides to have their first child; this is your typical planned pregnancy.   They buy a new home and all other certain baby necessities.   However, say that during this pregnancy the couple has a change of heart.   Say that spontaneously the couple decides that they do not yet desire a child.   Thus, they decide to have an abortion for the child that they had previously given the right to life; they had previously given it the right to use the mother’s body.   It would thus be an unjust killing of the fetus, and it violates the fetus’ right not to be killed unjustly. This result does not weaken Thomson’s argument by any means.   I say this because Thomson was arguing for when an abortion is not morally impermissible (Thomson p. 37).   She was not arguing for which cases an abortion is impermissible.   Therefore, further questioning as to which abortions would be unjust under Thomson’s argument would be irrelevant.   Also, I was able to make my argument without relinquishing any of Thomson’s claims.   Moreover, based on my argument, one can, in fact, make a claim for what â€Å"certain† cases of abortion are morally impermissible.   Lastly, Thomson is merely pretending that a fetus is a person from conception in the first place, so her notion that some abortions may be unjust is irrelevant to her opponent’s argument (Thomson p.37)

Monday, January 6, 2020

The Impacts Of Brazils Ever Changing Political Landscape

Brazil’s Ever Changing Political Landscape Never a quiet month in Brazil’s political scene. In May, there was the overwhelming impact of the taped conversation between President Temer and Joesley Batista, the meat tycoon, which allegedly addressed bribe payments and other criminal acts. Further convolutions in June, as the Prosecutor General denounced the head of the Executive branch for corruption. When conventional wisdom began to take hold that the country might witness the second government change in a little more than a year, a sudden turn of events happened in July. The Supreme Court needs the consent of the Chamber of Deputies to put Temer on a trial. In a show of force, however, the governing coalition swiftly passed a motion in†¦show more content†¦If the Court of Appeals upholds the conviction, he would probably be confined to home arrest and barred from seeking public office for eight years. Lula is a defendant in other four separate criminal cases and this blow might be the first of a series. He is the most prominent opposition leader and his perils further weaken the attempts to oust Temer. Brazilian asset prices reacted strongly (Charts I). Whereas investor sentiment deteriorated sharply when Temer’s taped conversations emerged in mid-May, the recent developments gave rise to rapid appreciation. The remarkable realized volatility in local financial markets came back to the forefront: 15% annualized for the exchange rate and 21% for the stock market index, year-to-date. In one specific case, however, there was a clearly defined trend underneath the noise. Lower-than expected CPI prints, and there has been a string of them, are driving inflation expectations down along with forward interest rates (Chart II). Political gyrations play a minor role here compared to successful disinflation and this speaks to the competence of the economic team. 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Sunday, December 29, 2019

Leukemia Cancer Outline - 668 Words

Introduction I. (Attention Getter) On February 22, 1999, my mother had an appointment for my one of my older brothers and I. She had noticed that she had a swollen gland in her neck and also had a bad cold sore so she decided to ask the doctor, why she couldn’t get her cold sore go away. They decided to run some blood and sent to a cancer doctor. She was diagnosed with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia two days later. II. (Information Hunger) Here isquestion for you, how many people in the United States do you think get leukemia in a year? According to the American Cancer Society, 43,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with leukemia each year III. (Purpose) After my speech today, you will know more information about leukemia. IV.†¦show more content†¦Conclusion I. In conclusion, my mother is a survivor of cancer, and is now living a healthy and active life. It has been 16 years since my mother found out she had cancer. 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Saturday, December 21, 2019

The Holocaust, a mass genocide of 600 Jews and 500...

The Holocaust, a mass genocide of 600 Jews and 500 additional undesiables. It happened during World War II (WWII) in Europe. It began with Austrian born Adolf Hitler. He was a World War I (WWI) veteran but faught for Germany. At the end of WWI he was in the hospital and by the time he recovered, Germany had lost the war. Enraged, he attempted to rebel against the German government yet ended up faiilng miserbaly. because of this he was sentanced to five years in prison. While in jail her wrote a book entitled Mein Kapmf. This was an outline of his plan for builing a better Germany. Due to this he only served roughly nine months of his original sentance. Once released from prison he became involved in poltics and rose through the ranks.†¦show more content†¦In his mind only Arian people were worthy of living in Europe. Among the on million of the children killed was Anne Frank. Anne was a Jewish, teenage, girl whos family went into hiding. They stayed hidden for over two years in their Secret Annex. Over the course of these two years, she kept a dairy that has now been published. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl had been translated into over 60 languages and is read and studdied world-wide. She began the dairy at age thirteen and wrote her last entree at age fifteen. The majority of her diary talks about her time spent in the Secret Annex which was the back part of a spice warehouse owned by her father previous to the Neurenburg Race Laws. The Franks lived with another family, the Van Danns, and another man named Dussel. On August 4, 1944 German officers stormed the Annex and arrested all families. They were then taken to a transfer camp called Westerbork. They spent roughly one month there before being moved to Auschwitz, a consentration camp. Once off the train men, women, and childern were all separated. That was the last time Anne saw her Father, Mr. Van Dann, Dussel, or Peter. This is when the dehumanization began. People working the camps strped them of glasses, jewlery, shoes, and anything else that made them a individual. In addition to this the Nazi cut their hair and put them all in uniforms so tthey all looked the same. After anther month of